MFJ in the News

Partnership for Children’s Rights Merges into MFJ to Help Families Secure Special Education Services

On June 11, 2018, Partnership for Children’s Rights (PFCR), a not-for-profit law firm founded in 1999 to protect the rights of New York City’s disadvantaged and disabled children, will be merging into Mobilization for Justice (MFJ), a 55-year-old prominent anti-poverty organization formerly known as MFY Legal Services.  The merger will dramatically expand MFJ’s ability to …

When Three-Quarter Houses Close, Tenants Have Nowhere Else to Turn

WNYC/Gothamist explores what happens when the “necessary evil” preventing homelessness falls apart. Reporter Lylla Younes describes in detail the closing of three-quarter houses operated by Interline, after operators were indicted for Medicaid fraud. MFJ Attorney Matthew Main commented that “While the exploitative practices of some three-quarter house operators are shamefully unjust, tenants have always emphasized …

Ditch the Wheelchair, or Find a New Place

In an article in today’s New York Times, Paula Span describes how people who use wheelchairs are being denied admission to certain adult care facilities, and the lawsuit filed on behalf of the Fair Housing Justice Center by MFJ and the AARP Foundation. The lawsuit names several adult care facilities along with the NYS Department …

MFJ Lawsuit: Sec. 8 Tenants Forced to Pay 80% of Income for Rent

In this article in AM-NY, MFJ Supervising Attorney Justin LaMort explains why MFJ and other legal services providers are suing the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) and the New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development (HPD) for problems in the way rent is calculated for tenants receiving enhanced Section 8 …

MFJ Testimony: Immigrant Children Need Equal Access to Benefits

In testimony before the New York City Council’s Committee on Immigration, MFJ Attorney Ernie Collette discusses the unequal access to benefits for immigrant children with Special Immigrant Juvenile Status and new rule changes that may mean immigrants who now legally receive certain non-cash public benefits would be barred from becoming lawful permanent residents.

MFJ Testimony: Greater Oversight of Supportive Housing Needed

MFJ Attorney Sandra Gresl testified at a hearing of the New York City Council’s Committee on General Welfare in support of Intro. 147, which will enable the city to provide greater oversight of supportive housing providers, particularly in monitoring the reasons for admission denials and evictions of tenants. Greater oversight would also enable the city …

MFJ and AARP File Lawsuit against NYS and Adult Homes to Stop Discrimination against People Using Wheelchairs

Mobilization for Justice and the AARP Foundation filed a lawsuit today on behalf of the Fair Housing Justice Center (FHJC) and one adult home resident and her representative alleging discrimination against people who use wheelchairs. After receiving complaints from residents, FHJC conducted testing at four adult homes and found that they had blanket policies barring …

MFJ Weighs In on NYS Failure to Protect Student Loan Borrowers

MFJ Attorney Evan Denerstein weighs in on the New York State legislature’s failure to enact legislation to protect student borrowers from unscrupulous loan servicers in an article in The Intercept. The law included provisions to license all servicers and to grant enforcement power to the state Department of Financial Services, and Governor Cuomo included the …

MFJ Speaks Out on Fairness to Consumers in Crain’s Op Ed

MFJ Attorney Ariana Lindermayer’s Op Ed in Crain’s New York Business supports strengthening New York State’s General Business Law, which has been singled out by the National Consumer Law Center as “toothless.” MFJ supports a bill introduced in the NYS Assembly by Yuh Line-Niou that prohibits unfair conduct, increases the available damages, and makes payment …

Airbnb and Rental Gentrification in Harlem

Uptown 1Radio talks to MFJ Attorney Justin LaMort about new report on Airbnb’s practices, which are shown to be contributing to racial gentrification in Harlem and other areas of NYC. LaMort notes that 1.2% of the available housing stock in NYC is off the rental market because the apartments are used exclusively for Airbnb rentals.  …

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